LAPD Shooting Victim Identified by Coroner as a 16-year-old Boy

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Daniel Enrique Perez was a 16-year-old boy who had been shot by the Los Angeles police force last weekend. After he succumbed to his wounds on Sunday evening, questions began to be raised against LAPD. Enrique was the second person to be shot down by LAPD in an approximate span of 24 hours. He had apparently pointed a handgun at the police, and, to retaliate, they had shot him down. The handgun was later found to be a replica gun, with the orange colour at the tip covered with a black marker or pen. The gun was apparently realistic looking enough for the police to be forced to take immediate action to ensure the safety of the officers and the residents of the street.

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Only about 24 hours before the incident with Perez had the department faced a similar situation. And they had reacted in a similar way when Carnell Snell Jr., 18, had, apparently, pointed a realistic looking gun at them. This had sparked a lot of protests and heat as people took to the streets to ask why the first reaction of the police department on encountering a black teenager with a gun would be to shoot him down and not speak to him first.

A day later, with the protests still raging, someone reported seeing a man with a gun at 48th and Ascot. There the police spotted Perez, who was wearing dark pants and a grey sweater, and, thinking that he matched the description, followed him. Then Perez is said to have pointed the “realistic” gun at them and they were forced to shoot him down, informed Charlie Beck, LAPD Chief. Beck also went on to say that the officers had been wearing body cameras and the footage goes on to prove what he and the officers have claimed. But he has refused to release these videos for public viewing, raising more suspicion about the matter, especially since a witness claims to have seen the officers rush at Perez without asking him to freeze and kept shooting him even after he was on the ground.

Black Lives Matter protestors outside of LAPD headquarters where a Police Commission Meeting was taking place with a hearing on the officer involved shooting of Redel Jones. The commission decided that the shooting was justified. (Photo by David Crane Southern California News Group)
Black Lives Matter protestors outside of LAPD headquarters where a Police Commission Meeting was taking place with a hearing on the officer involved shooting of Redel Jones. The commission decided that the shooting was justified. (Photo by David Crane Southern California News Group)

Perhaps in an attempt at disaster management, Beck released a footage documenting the moments before the officers shot Carnell Snell Jr. He does seem to have a handgun on him. Beck claims that he went on to point the gun at the officers after that. But Beck still insists on withholding the rest of the footage and the ones recorded when Perez was shot. This has led to the creation of even more suspicion and people are agreeing that body-camera footages are of no use if the public doesn’t get to see it, for it provides next to no transparency to them.